Setting vDisk boot menu as a default option

A Provisioning Services vDisk boot menu appears when the user is starting a provisioned Virtual Machine, but what if you want to start the Virtual Machine unattended.

Caution! This fix requires you to edit the registry. Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems that may require you to reinstall your operating system. Citrix cannot guarantee that problems resulting from the incorrect use of Registry Editor can be solved. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. Be sure to back up the registry before you edit it.”

  • Set the boot option as the first option in the start menu.
  • On all Provisioning Services servers, open the Registry Editor and browse to HKLMSoftwareCitrixProvisioningServices
  • Right-click Provisioning Services, click New, then DWORD Value “SkipBootMenu”.
  • Double-click the new DWORD and give it a Value data of 1 (a value of 0 will enable normal boot menu behavior).
  • Close Registry Editor.
  • Restart the Citrix Provisioning Services Stream Service on the Provisioning Services server(s).

View the original post here on the Citrix Knowledgebase.

Personal vDisk 5.6.7 released

Personal vDisk v5.6.7 provides a redesigned filter driver that improves overall application compatibility. This release also removes the need for an assigned drive letter for the app space (currently the V: drive) and offers dynamic free space balance between the apps and profile space on the user’s personal vDisk. This release reduces the PvD generated CPU overhead by 44%.

You can download Personal vDisk v5.6.7 here from the Citrix download center. A valid My Citrix ID is required to download the software.

You can read or download the administrator’s guide here.

vDisk Shows Unconnected (RED X in Status Tray) when attempting create a 6.x Image.

vDisk shows unconnected (RED X in status tray) when attempting to create a 6.x image.

Cause

Microsoft Network Monitor 3 Driver interferes with the Provisioning Services Target Device software while loading.

Continue reading “vDisk Shows Unconnected (RED X in Status Tray) when attempting create a 6.x Image.”

Provisioning Services Error: Management Interface: vDisk properties were lost

Another of my KB articles got published on the knowledgebase of Citrix.

Creating a vDisk from the target device fails before completion with the following error message:
"Management Interface: vDisk properties were lost."

Cause
Multiple server farms with incorrect vDisk settings for Load Balancing. In this example, the error was produced in a simple 2-server Provisioning Server farm configured with local storage as displayed:

CTX133504-1

Resolution
There is no solution at this moment for creating a vDisk in this way. A workaround is available by creating the vDisk on the Provisioning Server host itself.
This error is created because of the fact that the 2-local stores are not synchronized and Load Balancing assumes that the stores it connects to are synchronized. With two unsynchronized local stores, it is not possible to create the vDisk from the target device.

More Information
CTX129993 – Provisioning Services 6.0 Administrator’s Guide

CTX129994 – Provisioning Services 6.0 Installation and Configuration Guide

CTX121090 – Planning and implementing a Provisioning Server high availability (HA) solution

You can view the original article here.

Event ID 7026 – The following boot-start or system-start driver(s) failed to load: Bnistack

Symptoms

In VMware and Provisioning Server 6.0 and later, you cannot successfully connect to virtual disk while starting from the local Hard Drive because the 6.0, 6.1 Target Device software is binding to one of these ghost NICs producing a Red X in the virtual disk status tray. In the Event Viewer you see the following Event ID 7026:
The following boot-start or system-start driver(s) failed to load:
Bnistack

Cause

When installing the Provisioning Server Target Device software on the virtual machine you are trying to capture an image from are the “Ghost NICs” in Device Manager that the Target Device software is binding to.

Resolution

  1. Uninstall the Provisioning Server Target Device software from the virtual machine and restart.
  2. System Properties dialog box appears.
  3. Select the Advanced tab and click Environment Variables.
  4. Click the New button below the System Variables panel.
  5. In the New System Variable dialog box, type devmgr_show_nonpresent_devices in the Variable Name text box and 1 in the Variable Value text box.
  6. Click OK to return to the System Properties dialog box and then click OK again.
  7. Access Device Manager.>.View > Show Hidden Devices.
  8. Expand the network adapters in the device tree and look for the inactive icons, which indicate unused device drivers.
    Note
    : To remove an unused device driver, right-click the icon and select Uninstall
  9. Reinstall the Provisioning Server 6.0 or 6.1 Target Device software and restart. You should now be able to connect to the virtual disk.

The ghost NICs are as displayed in the following screen shot:

Note: Ensure to remove the environmental variable after completing the procedure.

You can read the original post here.

How to Resize Personal vDisk

This article describes how to resize the Personal vDisk (PvD).

Requirements

XenDesktop 5.6

Procedure

The following points should be kept in mind while resizing the PvD:

  • A PowerShell script is included in this release that allows you to resize existing personal vDisks in a catalog. The script iterates through the machines in the catalog, changing the size where possible. Resizing takes effect the next time the machines are turned on.
  • You cannot resize Windows XP machines hosted on VMware ESX using the script.
  • Do not use the script to manage existing environments in other ways. Use Desktop Studio or Provisioning Services for other management operations.
  • Before following this procedure, determine the current size of the personal vDisks and choose a new size. In addition, the following PowerShell snapins must be installed on the computer running the script:

the following procedure to resize the PvD:

  1. Put the machines in the catalog into maintenance mode.
  2. Locate the script resize-personal-vdiskpool.ps1 in the SupportToolsScripts folder of the full or upgrade image.
  3. At a command prompt, run the script and select the catalog whose personal vDisks you want to resize. If a script error occurs, dismiss it by running Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned.

    Note: If you do not have full administrator rights in Desktop Studio and you are using a 64-bit system, run the script from a 32-bit PowerShell administrator command prompt.

  4. Accept the defaults for the storage location and, if displayed, the decision on thin provisioning.
  5. The script displays these properties, which you should not change.
  6. Enter the new size for the personal vDisks. The minimum is 3 gigabytes (GB). Additional space may be required for user applications and data.
  7. When prompted, confirm the selections you made.
  8. Enter the administrator’s user name and password.
  9. Wherever possible, the personal vDisks in the catalog are resized and the machines they are attached to is restarted. When disk preparation is complete, the machines shut down. This process might take several minutes to complete.

    Note: The script lists the machines whose vDisks cannot be resized. Check the power state of these machines, and rerun the script to complete the resizing operation on the entire catalog.

You can read the original KB article here.

PVS console error when standard mode vDisk is prepared for KMS activation

When changing a virtual disk (vDisk) in private mode to KMS activation and then changing the mode to standard image mode OR changing the activation procedure to KMS for a vDisk in standard image mode, the following error message appears, which can be seen in the console.log (when in debug level) or in the console popup: “Failed to map vDisk, no Driver”

Cause

This happens only when the SOAPServer.exe or Citrix SOAP Service is running with NT AUTHORITYNetwork Service account. The console passes a request to prepare the vDisk for KMS, which requires the SOAP service to update the vDisk file system and registry entries. This update needs the vDisk to be mounted. The Network Service account does not have SE_MANAGE_VOLUME_NAME privilege which causes an “access is denied” error when it tries to mount the vDisk. Continue reading “PVS console error when standard mode vDisk is prepared for KMS activation”

personal vDisk FAQ

Q: How does personal virtual Disk work?

A: Unlike traditional Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) dedicated pooled deployments, where users lose their customizations and personal applications when the administrator alters the base virtual machine, deployments using personal vDisk retain those changes. This means administrators can easily and centrally manage their base virtual machines while providing users with a customized and personalized desktop experience.

Personal vDisk provides this separation by redirecting all changes made to the user’s virtual machine into a separate disk attached to the user’s virtual machine (the personal vDisk). The content of the personal vDisk is blended at runtime with the content from the base virtual machine to provide a unified experience. In this way, users can still access applications provisioned by their administrator in the base virtual machine.

Continue reading “personal vDisk FAQ”

Hide Virtual Disk tray icon

If you don’t want your users to see the virtual disk tray notification icon then you can remove this quite easy with the following registry key:

HKLMsoftwarecitrixProvisioningServicesStatusTray Key "ShowIcon" and set the value to 0.

Caution! This fix requires you to edit the registry. Using Registry Editor incorrectly can cause serious problems that might require you to reinstall your operating system. Citrix cannot guarantee that problems resulting from the incorrect use of Registry Editor can be solved. Use Registry Editor at your own risk. Be sure to back up the registry before you edit it