Differences between WI and StoreFront

In the newly released StoreFront Planning Guide (which you can find here) comes this great overview of differences between Web Interface and StoreFront.

Where StoreFront will go beyond Web Interface in the future

Feature Storefront   Web   Interface
XenDesktop   Deployment Scenarios
Cross farm aggregation and   de-duplication Next   version XA farm   migration Only
Configuration   through Citrix AppStudio Next   version No
IPV6   support Next   version No
Windows   Server 2012 support Next   version No
HTML 5 access on more devices Next   version
Authentication   Services
Smartcard support from most Receivers   (LAN and AG) Next   version Windows PNA on LAN Only
Unified EPA/Smart Access across   Receivers Next   version No
SDK for partner extensions (most   Receivers) Next   version Ad-hoc integrations, Web Only

Where StoreFront matches Web Interface Continue reading “Differences between WI and StoreFront”

How to: Troubleshoot pass-through authentication to Web Interface

This article defines troubleshooting steps for a failure in pass-through authentication. Symptoms include getting prompted for credentials at the Web Interface logon and also getting a logon screen when you attempt to launch a published application.

Procedure

Complete the following steps to troubleshoot pass-through authentication to Web Interface:

  • Verify that SSONSVR.EXE is running on the client machine. If Receiver was installed with the ENABLE_SSON=Yes command line switch, then the computer must be rebooted after the installation if not this process does not load. If this process is not running for any reason, pass-through authentication will not work.

How to Isolate Web Interface or Program Neighborhood Agent Sites into Their Own Application Pool for Best Performance

When Web Interfaces sites or Program Neighborhood Agent sites are part of a large deployment and are the primary method of accessing applications for an organization, you might consider isolating each Web Interface site or Program Neighborhood Agent site into their own IIS Application Pool.

Background

Each separate Application Pool provides a process boundary so that when a Web Interface site or Program Neighborhood Agent site is assigned to one application pool, problems in other application pools do not affect the application. This ensures that if a Web Interface site or Program Neighborhood Agent site fails, it does not affect the other Web Interface or Program Neighborhood Agent sites running in other application pools.

The process to create an Application Pool for Web Interface or Program Neighborhood Agent site is as follows:

Note: Before performing these changes, ensure that no users are accessing the Web Interface or Program Neighborhood Agent sites because their access will get interrupted. Continue reading “How to Isolate Web Interface or Program Neighborhood Agent Sites into Their Own Application Pool for Best Performance”